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diversityinya:

Analysis of the most banned/challenged books in the U.S. shows that diverse books are disproportionately targeted for book challenges and censorship. [Read more at Diversity in YA.]

(via thedigitallibrarian)

Source: diversityinya
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"You have but two topics, yourself and me, and I’m sick of both."

- Samuel Johnson to James Boswell

Samuel Johnson was born in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England on this day in 1709 to Michael Johnson, a bookseller, and his wife, Sarah Ford.  (via vintageanchorbooks)

(via maudnewton)

Source: vintageanchorbooks
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libraryjournal:

A little Thursday morning inspiration.

libraryjournal:

A little Thursday morning inspiration.

Source: pinterest.com
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Happy Birthday, Doctor Samuel Johnson (September 18, 1709), author of The Dictionary of the English Language (1755).

On my literary bucket list: James Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnson.

Source: youvegotaluckyface
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bookpatrol:

A five book (one letter and one record) birthday salute to william carlos williams

Today is the birthday of the influential American poet William Carlos Williams (1883-1963).

From the Poetry Foundation:

William Carlos Williams has always been known as an experimenter, an innovator, a revolutionary figure in American poetry. Yet in comparison to artists of his own time who sought a new environment for creativity as expatriates in Europe, Williams lived a remarkably conventional life. A doctor for more than forty years serving the New Jersey town of Rutherford, he relied on his patients, the America around him, and his own ebullient imagination to create a distinctively American verse.

The goods:

Paterson.  Published by New Directions, 1946-58. Williams’s magnum opus.

A Beginning of a Short Story. Published by The Alicat Bookshop Press, 1950. First edition.

Collected Poems. The Objectivist Press, 1934. Williams’s first “collected” edition.

The Farmers’ Daughters. New Directions, 1961 First edition, first printing. One of 1500 copies. Publisher’s file copy with file copy stamp to front endpaper.

Sour Grapes. Published in Boston by The Four Seas Company, 1921 First edition, first printing of Williams’ fifth book. One of 1000 copies. Signed and inscribed by Williams to close friend and fellow poet Mitchell Dawson.

William Carlos Williams Reading his Poems. Caedmon. 1954

Typed Letter Signed “W.C. Williams” 1p, 8.5” x 11”. Rutherford, N.J., October 19, 1938.To John Crowe Ransom, Editor The Kenyon Review, Gambier, Ohio. Fine condition.“Your letter, about the Lorca article, put me right back on my feet again…”

One of my favorite poets

Happy Birthday, W.C.!

Source: bookpatrol
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by れんとん

Good night, sweet dreams!

(via petitpoulailler)

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ebookfriendly:

This #book mural was created in Valencia, Spain, by Escif street art group http://ebks.to/1qaOTCF

Says so much about book censorship. Powerful.

ebookfriendly:

This #book mural was created in Valencia, Spain, by Escif street art group http://ebks.to/1qaOTCF

Says so much about book censorship. Powerful.

Source: ebookfriendly
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housingworksbookstore:

poetrysociety:

Anne Bradstreet (born Anne Dudley; who died September 16, 1672) was the first poet and first female writer in the British North American colonies to be published. 

A gentlewoman in those parts.
AW

housingworksbookstore:

poetrysociety:

Anne Bradstreet (born Anne Dudley; who died September 16, 1672) was the first poet and first female writer in the British North American colonies to be published. 

A gentlewoman in those parts.

AW

Source: poetrysociety
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millionsmillions:

With the advent of e-readers, books on the subway are getting harder and harder to spot. It takes dedication to get a sense of what people are reading these days. At The Awl, Ben Dolnick sets out to catalogue a week’s worth of sightings, which included a man reading Cloud Atlas and The Stranger and a teenage girl reading Thornton Wilder’s Our Town. You could also read our own Nick Moran on the question of whether e-readers are really green.

millionsmillions:

With the advent of e-readers, books on the subway are getting harder and harder to spot. It takes dedication to get a sense of what people are reading these days. At The AwlBen Dolnick sets out to catalogue a week’s worth of sightings, which included a man reading Cloud Atlas and The Stranger and a teenage girl reading Thornton Wilder’s Our Town. You could also read our own Nick Moran on the question of whether e-readers are really green.

Source: millionsmillions